James Mangold, director of Fox's Marvel adaptations The Wolverine and its R-rated sequel Logan, expressed concerns that the deal would lead to the extinction of certain films not suitable for the Disney brand or be reshuffled in order to accommodate more Disney blockbusters, thereby limiting the opportunities for certain filmmakers as well as the consumers. Mangold said that "If they're actually changing their mandate, if what they're supposed to do alters, that would be sad to me because it just means less movies."[83]
American Cable Association President and CEO Matthew M. Polka lambasted the deal and called on federal regulators to "fully investigate" the merger. He was concerned about his smaller cable constituents having to negotiate multichannel deals with a behemoth that combines Fox's regional sports networks with ESPN and its cadre of collegiate-conference-focused RSNs, as well as the majority stake in Hulu:[74][75]

This beautiful coral island in the Great Barrier Reef has a unique and interesting history. Over 6000 years old, this charming little Island was made up of sand sediments and coral deposits gradually building up until it reached the size it is today. From there winds and birds carried seeds to Green Island creating the start of the vegetated rainforest we see today. Before white-man discovered Green Island, the island was home to Australian native aboriginals who used the island as a fishing base and also as a ceremonial site where men were initiated. In 1770 Captain James Cook discovered Green Island and named the island after the chief astronomer and observer on his ship, Charles Green. A sea cucumber smoking station was the first industry that presented itself on Green Island in 1857. After years of occasional pleasure cruising to Green Island the Hayes Family started a regular ferry service between Cairns and Green Island in 1924. Declared a National Park in 1948 Green Island was home to many ‘firsts’ in terms of marine-life activities. Green Island had the first ever glass bottom boat, one of the first underwater observatories, one of the first semi-submarines and the first island-based movie theatre in the world. The Great Barrier Reef was declared a National Marine Park in 1974 and following this a brand new eco-friendly resort replaced the other two resorts that had existed previously.
Just steps from the pristine Four Mile Beach Peppers Beach Club Resort is suited to medium sized wedding celebrations with up to 60 guests. There are many beautiful locations onsite perfect for your ceremony and reception. Begin your special day with an exchange of vows on the pool terrace, poolside on the sandy beach or nearby the historic St Mary’s by the sea delivers a traditional option.
On February 13, 2018, television producer Ryan Murphy, a long-time collaborator of 20th Century Fox Television, signed a five-year $300 million agreement with Netflix, a move considered to be a big blow to Fox and Disney. Murphy cited the Disney–Fox deal as the main reason for departure, arguing that his freedom under Disney might be severely limited in creating new, risk-taking content.[86]
The Green Island Resort prides itself in being “green by name… green by nature”, therefore several environmental efforts have been initiated to operate in a sustainable manner. The Green Island Resort has its Australian Advanced Eco-Certification and is setting benchmarks in Australia’s Tourism and Hospitality Industry for sustainable and environmentally friendly operations. The following are some of the eco-sensitive measures that Green Island Resort takes to ensure environment is the first priority. In the construction of the resort there was a consorted effort to keep the natural environment well intact, little vegetation was cleared and boardwalks were built to avoid damage to plants and foliage. The resort was built around large trees, encompassing the trees into the natural design. None of the resort’s buildings protrude above the rainforest canopy, keeping a natural camouflaged presence. A desalination plant was built in 2001 that produces 55,000 litres of freshwater daily; this ensures that the islands underground water is not disturbed. The resort was built without gutters so the natural rainwater can fall on the surrounding foliage to replenish the moisture levels to the islands vegetation. In terms if sewage, the resort has one of the most sophisticated tertiary sewage plants in Australia. The resort’s power supply is provided by four diesel generators that are enclosed in a sound proof building to prevent noise pollution; these generators serve another purpose of heating water in the cooler months. The waste produced on Green Island is barged back to the mainland and materials are re-used and recycled at all costs. Green Island Resort has been awarded several awards commemorating its innovative waste management systems including the winner of Australia’s Cleanest Beach Challenge, a Resource Conservation Award and a Waste Management Award.
The thing is, a lot of these offers aren’t... great? Like, they’re not terrible—well, some of them are—but there’s really only one that’s legitimately excellent, and that one started earlier this month and goes through the end of the year. As such, we’ve made some notes. Forgive us, we’re a little cranky, and don’t think $1 french fries are anything to write home about, McDonald’s. This is a partial list, of course—there’s so much fast food, we couldn’t possibly include every chain—compiled from roundups courtesy of Treasure Coast Newspapers, Delish, and BGR. We’ve broken them into four self-explanatory categories.
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